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Basic Department

Physiology

About the Department
Education Program
Physiology Faculty
 

Education Program

Medical Courses
Graduate Courses

Medical Physiology

Course Description:
The course consists of approximately 147 lectures hours, laboratory and computer exercises, group discussions, plus examinations (including NBME subject exam in Physiology). The content of the course is designed for medical students, but is also a required course for graduate students in the Biomedical Sciences. Areas to be covered will include: cell and muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, acid-base balance, gastrointestinal, endocrinology, and reproduction. Clinical examples that illustrate the physiological principles are given.

Total Hours: 147
Exams: 3

Textbook: Medical Physiology, Guyton, 10 th Edition

Other Books that may be helpful:

  • Physiology, Berne & Levy
  • Human Physiology, Vander, Sherman, and Luciano
  • Review of Medical Physiology, Ganong
  • NMS Physiology Review

Lectures:
A separate lecture schedule covering the semester is given to the students at the beginning of the course. Written objectives covering the subject listed for the day will be given to the students. The subject matter will be illustrated with audiovisual materials during the lectures (35mm slides, transparencies, overhead projector, computers, etc.).

Laboratories:
Laboratory experiments are designed for the following purposes:

  • To illustrate basic concepts of physiology in the living organism. Physiology is dynamic; it is the continuing, active, functioning of the body and must be observed in living models.
  • To serve as an exercise in the simultaneous observation of several progressively changing states of biological function following stimulation or suppression of a particular function. The students will realize that the change of a function in the higher organism initiates a complex of specific responses, which often progress at different rates in different organs. In physiology—as in medicine—the successful interpretation of an event involves analysis to determine the specific functions altered in the light of an integrity of the “organism as a whole”.

Lab exercises will be offered according to the course schedule. The class has been divided into 6 groups. In order to know to what group he/she belongs to, the student must check the lists on the bulletin board at the Department of Physiology. Any student wishing to change their assigned group must find a student in another group who is willing to exchange places. Both students must then notify the Department of the change.

Laboratories will include computer exercises with programs provided by the Department.

The schedule indicates which groups are assigned to the specific lab periods.

Discussion Groups:
Students are assigned to one of 6 groups, the same as for laboratories. Discussion groups will meet according to the assigned schedule. The groups will meet with a different instructor during each block. The groups will meet at the time and place indicated in the schedule. These discussions are an important part of the total learning process in physiology. Attendance, participation, and preparation are evaluated in each discussion group. Faculty will assist the students in assessing their knowledge. Students are encouraged to ask questions and seek to gain fuller understanding of underlying principles and physiologic concepts.

Evaluation of Student Progress:

  • Examinations
    As announced in the program and as scheduled in the exam block. These exams will be comprehensive and will cover all the material covered prior to the test. The exams will consist of 100-120 objective questions, structured in USMLE format, which should be answered in two hours. The average of all written examinations will represent 55% of the final course grade. No make-up exams will be given.
  • Discussion Groups
    Small and large group discussions will be graded as follows:
    • Attendance is required.
    • Preparation and participation will be evidenced by the performance of the student in the quizzes, which will be given at the end of each discussion session.

    The average of all quizzes for discussion groups will represent 10% of the final course grade.

  • Labs
    The average of all quizzes or practical exercises given at the end of each laboratory session will represent 5% of the final course grade.

  • Final Exam
    The final exam will be the National Boards Subject Examination in Physiology. The result of this exam will represent 30% of the final course grade.

SUMMARY OF STUDENT EVALUATION
% Final Course Grade
Objective Written Exams (3)
55
Small Group Discussions
10
Labs
5
NBME Subject Exam
30
Final Grade Total
100

Final grades in Medical Physiology Course will be based in the following fixed standards:

H 90
P 70
F Below 70

Minimum passing grade for medical students is 70%.

A 87
B 77
C 67
F Below 67

Minimum passing grade for graduate students is 77%.

Attendance:
Attendance will be taken in all scheduled activities of the Department (lectures, small group discussions, labs, etc.).

Students are expected to attend all academic activities of the Department.

 
Electives in Research
Electives are available to fourth year students with the preliminary approval of the department chair and final approval by Clinical Coordinator. Permission from researcher must be requested and written research protocol must be submitted prior to approval of elective.
 
Graduate Level Gastrointestinal Physiology PHY 731

Prerequisites:
Medical Physiology course (PHY-701), or adequate prior laboratory experience.

Credits:
2 per semester

Description:
Given in the physiology department, this course will cover gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology in more depth than in the medical physiology course. This is a graduate level course that will require extensive reading and analysis.

Objective:
To provide a forum for reading and discussion of advanced topics in the gastrointestinal field, and to develop critical thinking.

Format:
The course will meet once per week (2 hours) with reading assignments. The format will be guided discussion with student presentations of research papers during the latter part of the course. Evaluation will be based on discussion participation, oral presentations, and a term paper.

Materials:
Readings will come from book chapters and original articles, both current and classic.

Topics:
Will cover all areas of gastrointestinal physiology.

Faculty:
Dr. Appleyard

Offered:
First semester

 
Advanced Topics in Gastrointestinal Physiology PHY 735

Prerequisites:
Graduate Level Gastrointestinal Physiology course (PHY-731), or adequate laboratory experience.

Credits:
2 per semester

Description:
Given in the physiology department, this course will focus on several specific topics in gastrointestinal physiology and pathophysiology. This is a graduate level course that will require extensive reading and analysis.

Objective:
To provide a forum for reading and discussion of advanced topics in the gastrointestinal field, and to develop critical thinking.

Format:
The course will meet once per week (2 hours) with reading assignments. The format will be guided discussion with student presentations of research papers during the latter part of the course. Evaluation will be based on discussion participation, oral presentations, and a term paper.

Materials:
Readings will come from book chapters and original articles, both current and classic.

Topics:
Will vary depending on the student’s interests. May include such topics as:

  • Innervation of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Pathophysiology of gastrointestinal diseases.
  • Ulceration and inflammation in the GI tract.

Faculty:
Dr. Appleyard

Offered:
Second semester


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